Course syllabus

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LATIN 100/G: Introduction to Latin Language 1

SEMESTER 1, 2018

15 points

 
Course Convenor and Teacher:

Lisa Bailey and Alecia Bland

Course delivery format:

3 hours of lecture and one hour of tutorial per week

(Timetable and room details can be viewed on Student Services Online)

 Summary of Course Description:              

Latin 100/100G is a course in beginner’s Latin and assumes no prior knowledge of the language. By the end of the course students will be able to produce and translate simple sentences. The course will also include a series of more general lectures, which will contextualise the Latin language in its broader social and cultural situation.

 Course outcomes:

A student who successfully completes this course will have the opportunity to:

  • translate and produce simple sentences in Latin
  • acquire a working knowledge of basic Latin grammar
  • learn about the development of the Latin language in its historical context
  • acquire skills in language learning and translation
  • understand the Latin influence on both English and other modern languages
  • establish the foundations for advanced study in Latin

 Assessment Summary:

Coursework:

Online quizzes: 10%

Assignment   10%

Best two of three in-class tests: 30%

2 hour Examination:  50%

 

Prescribed Texts:

Wheelock's Latin: The Classic Introductory Latin Course, by Frederic Wheelock (revised by Richard A. LaFleur), published by HarperCollins, 7th edition (2011).

NB: Please ensure that you purchase the correct edition of the text, as it has been in print for many years. It is vital that you purchase the correct (7th) edition of the text, as it has been modified from previous editions. This text is compulsory for both Latin 100 and Latin 101.

 

 Workload:           

The University of Auckland's expectation is that students spend 10 hours per week on a 15-point course, including time in class and personal study. Students should manage their academic workload and other commitments accordingly. Deadlines for coursework are set by course convenors and will be advertised in course material. You should submit your work on time. In extreme circumstances, such as illness, you may seek an extension but you may be required to provide supporting information before the assignment is due. Late assignments without a pre-approved extension may be penalised by loss of marks – check course information for details.

Course summary:

Date Details