Course syllabus

 

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SOCIOL 101/101G: Understanding Aotearoa New Zealand

SUMMER SCHOOL, 2019

15 points

 

Lecturer:  Richey Wyver

Lecture times: 

Tuesdays 1000-1100 and 1200-1300

Thursdays 1000-1100 and 1200-1300

Email: rwyv004@aucklanduni.ac.nz

Office Hours: TBC (or by appointment)

Tutorial: You will also attend a weekly tutorial (enrol via SSO) 

 

Course Description       

The course invites you to think sociologically about life in Aotearoa New Zealand. In focusing on the social processes, institutions and identities that make New Zealand what it is today, the course asks you to think in possibly new and different ways about what it means to live here today.

In particular, you will have an opportunity to explore the way in which your life and the lives of your family and friends are shaped by major axes of difference such as:

  • Ethnicity
  • Gender
  • Sexuality
  • Class

Additionally, you will get to explore a number of current social debates, for example, about violence, punishment and the environment. We will use both written texts and audio-visual material to examine these matters.

The course introduces you to central and at times complex sociological ideas and concepts, so if you want to get the most out of the course you should:

  • make coming to class and tutorials a top priority;
  • commit yourself to reading and studying for 8-10 hours per week on average over the semester;
  • be willing to actively participate through sharing your thoughts and relevant experiences in both lectures and tutorials;
  • and be open to new perspectives and ideas.

If you do all of these things, we are sure you will enjoy and successfully complete the course!

 

Learning Outcomes

On the successful completion of this course you should:

  • Be able to define and apply a range of sociological concepts to the study of society
  • Be able to explain the sociological imagination and apply it to a range of social issues
  • Have a foundational sociological understanding of New Zealand society
  • Have developed skills in analysing sociological readings

 

Assessment Summary

(for more in-depth information see the Course Outline)

1. In-class Test (worth 20%)

The in-class test will provide you with invaluable feedback on your understanding of the issues and key concepts we have looked at from Weeks 1-2. Tutorials are essential in preparing you for this test. Your tutor will go over the test format during Tutorial 2 (week 2). The in-class test will take place in the morning lecture in Week 3 on Tuesday 22nd January (10-11am, during lecture time)

2. Reflective Reading Assignment. 2000 words (worth 30%) due at 4pm on Monday 4th February, 2019

3. Final Examination (worth 50%)

 

Prescribed Texts

You need to purchase the course textbook, A Land of Milk and Honey? from the University Bookshop or online before the course starts. Most assigned readings are in this book and these are a key part of the course. They will provide the basis for discussions in class and tutorials, the reading assignment, the in-class test and the final exam. Any assigned readings not in the textbook will be available electronically through Talis.

Some further readings are available from the library course page (http://coursepages.library.auckland.ac.nz/sociol/101/).

To enable you to read more widely with ease the following books have been placed in the Short Term Loan Collection in the Kate Edgar Building:

Bell, Claudia (ed.). 2001. Sociology of Everyday Life in New Zealand. Palmerston North: Dunmore.

Liu, James H., Timothy McCreanor, Tracey McIntosh and Teresia Teaiwa (eds.). 2005. New Zealand Identities: Departures and Destinations. Wellington: Victoria University Press.

McLennan, Gregor, Ruth McManus and Paul Spoonley (eds.). 2010. Exploring Society: Sociology for New Zealand Students. Auckland: Pearson.

Novitz, David and Bill Willmott (eds.). 1989. Culture and Identity in New Zealand. Wellington: GP Books.

Roper, Brian S. 2005. Prosperity for All? Economic, Social and Political Change in New Zealand since 1935. Southbank, Vic: Thomson.

Spoonley, Paul, Cluny Macpherson and David Pearson (eds.). 2004. Tangata, Tangata: The Changing Ethnic Contours of New Zealand. Southbank, Vic: Thomson.

You will also find interesting things to read in (accessible through the library):

  • New Zealand Sociology
  • Kotuitui: New Zealand Journal of Social Sciences Online
  • Sites: A Journal of Social Anthropology and Cultural Studies
  • MAI Review

 

In addition, the following two resources are excellent for working out the meaning of sociological terms and extending your knowledge and insights:

Johnson, Allan G. 2000. The Blackwell Dictionary of Sociology. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

Ritzer, George (ed.). 2007. Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

 

Lecture Outline

Week 1

Lecture 1: Introduction/What is Sociology?                                                                               

Lecture 2: Private Troubles, Public Issues                                                                  

Reading (see Canvas ‘Reading List’): McLennan, Gregor., Ryan, Allanah., and Spoonley, Paul. (2000). The Sociological Imagination: Insights, Themes and Skills. In Mclennan, G., Ryan, A. and Spoonley, P. (eds.) Exploring Society: Sociology for New Zealand Students. 2nd ed. (pp. 1-16). Auckland: Pearson.

Lecture 3: A Settler Society                                                                          

Reading (in textbook): Wynyard, Matthew. (2017). Plunder in a Promised Land: Maori Land Alienation and the Genesis of Capitalism in Aotearoa New Zealand. In Bell, A., Elizabeth, V., McIntosh, T. and Wynyard, M. (eds.), A Land of Milk and Honey?: Making sense of Aotearoa New Zealand  (pp. 13-25). Auckland: Auckland University Press.

Lecture 4: Using the Sociological Imagination                          

Reading (in textbook): Shaw, Richard. (2017). We’re all in this together: Democracy and Politics in Aotearoa New Zealand. In Bell, A., Elizabeth, V., McIntosh, T. and Wynyard, M. (eds.), A Land of Milk and Honey?: Making sense of Aotearoa New Zealand (pp. 43-56). Auckland: Auckland University Press.

 

Week 2

Lecture 5: Tino Rangatiratanga                     

Reading (in textbook): Walker, Ranginui. (2017). Rangatiratanga, Kāwanatanga and the Constitution. In Bell, A., Elizabeth, V., McIntosh, T. and Wynyard, M. (eds.), A Land of Milk and Honey?: Making sense of Aotearoa New Zealand  (pp. 26-43). Auckland: Auckland University Press.

Lecture  6: Political Activism and Land Protests                            

Documentary: Te Reo Television. (1997). Inside New Zealand: Radicals. New Zealand: TV3 Network and New Zealand on Air.

Lecture  7: Māori Identities                                                             

Reading (see Canvas 'Reading List'): McIntosh, Tracey. (2005). Māori Identities: Fixed, Fluid, Forced. In: Liu, J.H., McCreanor, T., McIntosh, T. and Teaiwa, T. (eds.), New Zealand Identities: Departures and Destinations. Wellington: Victoria University Press. 

Additional reading (in textbook): Tukutai, Tahu., and Webber, Melinda. (2017). Ka Pū te Ruha, Ka Hao te Rangitahi: Māori Identities in the Twenty-first Century. In Bell, A., Elizabeth, V., McIntosh, T. and Wynyard, M. (eds.), A Land of Milk and Honey?: Making sense of Aotearoa New Zealand  (pp. 71-82). Auckland: Auckland University Press.

Lecture 8: Pākehā Identity                                                              

Reading (in textbook): Matthewman, Steve. (2017). Pākehā Ethnicity: The Politics of Privilege. In Bell, A., Elizabeth, V., McIntosh, T. and Wynyard, M. (eds.), A Land of Milk and Honey?: Making sense of Aotearoa New Zealand  (pp. 83-92). Auckland: Auckland University Press.

Additional reading: Mikaere, Ani. (2004). Are We All New Zealanders Now? A Maori Response to the Pakeha Quest for Indigeneity. Red & Green, 4: 33-45.         

 

Week 3

Lecture  9: In-class Test

Lecture 10: The New Zealand Revolution

Documentary: Barry, Alister., and Johnstone, Ian. (2002). In a Land of Plenty: The Story of Unemployment in New Zealand. New Zealand: Community Media Trust and Vanguard Films.

Lecture 11: Neoliberalism

Reading (in textbook): Humpage, Louise. (2017). The land of me and money? New Zealand society under neoliberalism. In Bell, A., Elizabeth, V., McIntosh, T. and Wynyard, M. (eds.), A Land of Milk and Honey?: Making sense of Aotearoa New Zealand. Auckland: Auckland University Press, pp.121-133.

Lecture  12: Class Inequality                                                           

Reading (in textbook): McNeill, Kellie. (2017). The Poor Will Always Be With Us. In Bell, A., Elizabeth, V., McIntosh, T. and Wynyard, M. (eds.), A Land of Milk and Honey?: Making sense of Aotearoa New Zealand (pp.146-157). Auckland: Auckland University Press, .                                 

Additional documentary: Barry, Alister., and Johnstone, Ian. (1996). Someone Else's Country: The Story of the New Right Revolution in New Zealand. New Zealand: Community Media Trust and Vanguard Films.

 

Week 4

Lecture 13: Migration and Multiculturalism   

Lecture  14: Pacific New Zealanders                                          

Documentary: Salmon, Dan et al. (2010). Polynesian Panthers: A Documentary. Tumanako Productions.

Reading (in textbook): Mila, Karlo. (2017). Deconstructing the Big Brown Tails/Tales: Pasifika People in Aotearoa New Zealand. In Bell, A., Elizabeth, V., McIntosh, T. and Wynyard, M. (eds.), A Land of Milk and Honey?: Making sense of Aotearoa New Zealand (pp.95-107). Auckland: Auckland University Press.

Additional reading (see Canvas ‘Reading List’): Anae, M. (2003). O A’u/I-My identity journey. In P. Fairbrain-Dunlop and G. S. Makisi (Eds.), Making Our Place: Growing up PI in New Zealand (pp. 19-45). Australia: Dunmore Press Ltd.

                           

Lecture 15: Chinese New Zealanders                                         

Documentary: Scott, Gary., and Gibson, Dave. (2007). Here to Stay. New Zealand: TVNZ

Reading (see Canvas ‘Reading List’): Ip, Manying., and Pang, David. (2005). New Zealand Chinese Identity: Sojourners, Model Minority and Multiple Identities. In: Liu, J.H., McCreanor, T., McIntosh, T. and Teaiwa, T. (eds.) New Zealand Identities: Departures and Destinations. Wellington: Victoria University Press.

Additional Reading (see Canvas ‘Reading List’): Ward, Colleen., and Lin, En-Yi. (2005). Immigration, Acculturation and National Identity. In: Liu, J.H., McCreanor, T., McIntosh, T. and Teaiwa, T. (eds.) New Zealand Identities: Departures and Destinations. (pp. 155-206). Wellington: Victoria University Press.

Additional Documentaries: Bates, John, and Manying, Ip. (2004). New Faces, Old Fears. New Zealand: Bates Productions.

Kiwa Productions. (2002). Inside New Zealand: Chinks, Coconuts and Curry Munchers. New Zealand: TV3.

 

Lecture 16: Guest Lecture (Julie Zhu, Asians Supporting Tino Rangatiratanga)

 

Week 5

Assignment due on Monday 4th February at 4pm

Both copies of the assignment (hard copy and electronic) must be submitted by 4pm and they must be exactly the same.

Lecture 17: Migration and Multiculturalism 2                                                                

Lecture 18: Queer ANZ                                                     

Reading (see Canvas ‘Reading List’): Town, Shane. (1999). Queer(Y)ing Masculinities in Schools: Faggots, Fairies and the First XV. In: Law, R., Campbell, H. and Dolan, J. (eds.) Masculinities in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Palmerston North: Dunmore.

Suggested optional reading (see Canvas ‘Reading List’):

Schmidt, Johanna. (2017). Homosexuality in Aotearoa New Zealand: Regulation and Resistance. In Bell, A., Elizabeth, V., McIntosh, T. and Wynyard, M. (eds.), A Land of Milk and Honey?: Making sense of Aotearoa New Zealand. Auckland: Auckland University Press, pp.173-185.

Lecture 19: Women’s Movement and Social Change                                                   

Documentary: Goldson, Annie and Dawn Hutchesson. (2004). Sheilas 28 Years on. New Zealand: Smiley Film Distribution.

Reading (in textbook): Schuster, Julia. (2017). We Still Need Feminisim in Aotearoa: The Achievements and Unfinished Tasks of the Women’s Movement. In Bell, A., Elizabeth, V., McIntosh, T. and Wynyard, M. (eds.), A Land of Milk and Honey?: Making sense of Aotearoa New Zealand  (pp.173-185). Auckland: Auckland University Press.

Lecture 20: Gender Inequalities                   

Reading (in textbook):  Elizabeth, Vivienne. (2017). Gender Inequalities are a Thing of the Past. Yeah Right! In Bell, A., Elizabeth, V., McIntosh, T. and Wynyard, M. (eds.), A Land of Milk and Honey?: Making sense of Aotearoa New Zealand (pp.212-226). Auckland: Auckland University Press.

 

Additional Documentary: Nash, Terre, Kent Martin and Marilyn Warning. (1995). Who's Counting?: Marilyn Waring on Sex, Lies and Global Economics. New Zealand: National Film Board of Canada and Media Services NZ.

 

Week 6

Lecture  21: A Violent Society?                                                       

Reading (in textbook): Elizabeth, Vivienne. (2017). No Promised Land: Domestic Violence, Marginalisation and Masculinity. In Bell, A., Elizabeth, V., McIntosh, T. and Wynyard, M. (eds.), A Land of Milk and Honey?: Making sense of Aotearoa New Zealand  (pp. 239-250). Auckland: Auckland University Press.

Suggested optional reading: Currie, Elliott. (1997). Market, Crime and Community: Toward a Mid-Range Theory of Post-Industrial Violence. Theoretical Criminology, 1(2): 147-172.

Lecture 22: An Incarcerated Society? (Guest Lecturer, Luke Oldfield)                             

Reading (in textbook): McIntosh, Tracey & Goldman, Bartek. (2017). Locked up: Incarceration in Aotearoa New Zealand. In Bell, A., Elizabeth, V., McIntosh, T. and Wynyard, M. (eds.), A Land of Milk and Honey?: Making sense of Aotearoa New Zealand. Auckland: Auckland University Press, pp.251-263.

Suggested optional reading: Pratt, John., and Clark, Marie. (2005). Penal Populisim in New Zealand. Punishment and Society, 7(3): 303-322.

Lecture 23: Green NZ                                                                                 

Reading (in textbook): Tucker, Corinna. (2017). Clean, Green Aotearoa New Zealand? In Bell, A., Elizabeth, V., McIntosh, T. and Wynyard, M. (eds.), A Land of Milk and Honey?: Making sense of Aotearoa New Zealand. Auckland: Auckland University Press, pp.278-290.

Additional Documentaries: Top Shelf Productions. (2006). Inside New Zealand: Our Dirty Little Secret. TV3: New Zealand.

TV3 Network. (1995). Inside New Zealand: The Poisoning of New Zealand. TV3: New Zealand.

Lecture 24: Course Summary and Exam Revision

                                                 

 Workload and Submission of Coursework            

In this intense course, you will need to attend four one-hour lectures a week, as well as a weekly tutorial. Lecture slides, audio recordings, and useful information relating to assignments will be regularly uploaded to the Canvas page. Students are responsible for keeping up with the readings, taking notes and attending lectures, and we encourage you to get to know your classmates, support each other and discuss course content together. There will be three assessments: an in-class test, an essay ("Reflective Reading Assignment"), and an end of course exam. The tutorials will mainly focus on preparation for the assessments, so it is highly recommended that you attend them every week.

You should submit your assignments on time. In extreme circumstances, such as illness, you may seek an extension but you will be required to provide supporting information before the assignment is due. Late assignments without a pre-approved extension will be penalised by loss of marks. If you need an extension, you must organise this with the lecturer. 

Course summary:

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