Course syllabus

Tree of Life Bus

ENGLISH 700: PACIFIC POETRY

 

SEMESTER 1, 2019
Course Information

Kia ora, Talofa lava, Malo e lelei,  Ni sa bula vinaka, Namaste,  Kia orana, Taloha ni,

Ia orana, Fakaalofa lahi atu, 'Alii, Malo ni, Halo Olaketa, Mauri, Aloha mai e and

warm Pacific Greetings.

  • Course Coordinator, Teacher, Tutor 
  • Assoc. Prof. Selina Tusitala Marsh s.marsh@auckland.ac.nz
  • Course delivery format
  • 3 hours of lectures, discussions, field trips

(Timetable and room details can be viewed on Student Services Online)

 

Prescribed Texts/Viewings:

Poetry on the Page

  •  Mauri Ola: Contemporary Polynesian Poets in English, eds, Albert Wendt, Reina Whaitiri and Robert Sullivan (Auckland: AUP, 2010).
  • Puna Wai Korero: An Anthology of Maori Poetry in English, eds, Reina Whaitiri and Robert Sullivan (Auckland: AUP, 2014).

Poetry on the Stage

Wild Dogs Under My Skirt (Auckland Arts Festival, Writer: Tusiata Avia,
Director: Anapela Polata'ivao), class attendance: Friday 8th March, 7-8.15pm.  Please see website to obtain tickets.  If you are unable to make this viewing in Week 1, there are other show times available, check it out:

https://www.eventfinda.co.nz/2019/aaf-wild-dogs-under-my-skirt/auckland#when

Poetry on the Staged Page

History Project English by Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner (Graphic Novel - see under Files)

 

Summary of Course Description              

Pacific Poetry holds the poetry and scholarship of Pacific peoples at its centre. Through the study of two major anthologies of Māori and Pacific writing, this course will:

 

  • Define and critically contextualize key terminology: ‘Indigenous’, ‘Oceanic’, ‘Pacific’, ‘Oceanic feminist’ ‘trans-indigenous’, ‘trans-cultural’, ‘Rhetorical Sovereignty’, ‘Aesthetic Sovereignty’ , ‘Diaspora’, ‘Identity Politics’, ‘Culture’, ‘Pacific Epistemology’, ‘Literary Decolonisation’, ‘Bi-languaging’.
  • Build upon key postcolonial concepts covered in ENGLISH 112 (Global Literatures), ENGLISH 204 (Pacific Literature) and compliment ENGLISH 702 (formerly ENGLISH 786 Postcolonial Literature). 
  • Identify key working metaphors in a select group of poets’ work and transform that metaphor into an aesthetic framework through which to read the work in order to reposition literary criticism from its Eurocentric bases and bias and address an Indigenous audience and readership.
  • Consider the politics of insider/outsider critical positioning.
  • Consider the role literature plays in reconfiguring the nature of cultural identities in the Pacific, especially literary challenges to colonial representations of identity in the Pacific.
  • Articulate the social, cultural, political and historical contexts of different genres within Pacific poetry and the central arguments surrounding its critical appreciation.
  • Close read a poem by identifying key literary and aesthetic techniques according to both indigenous and western literary traditions. 
  • Practice the Samoan concept of ‘Teu le Va’ by ‘adorning the space’ between poetry and people.     
  • This is a text-based class. The anthologies are used as a springboard from which to examine poet’s other works and collections. Timely field trips will extend the learning environment (pertinent Art Gallery exhibitions/poetry readings/community events).

 

Course Assessment

Assessment

Mark Out Of

Weighting

Words

Due Date

ANALYSIS

20

20%

2,000

15/04/19

SEMINAR

20

20%

500

03/05/19

ESSAY

60

60%

7,000

10/06/19

 

Course outcomes

By the end of this course you will be able to:

 

  • Identify key critical issues and scholarly works in the field of Indigenous and Oceanic Literary Studies.
  • Identify key postcolonial concepts relevant to the production and reception of Pacific Literature.
  • Identify instances of Indigenous Literary criticism and employ culturally-specific aesthetics and critical tools of literary appreciation.
  • Examine texts within an Indigenous and Oceanic feminist context.
  • Discuss the role literature plays in reconfiguring the nature of cultural identities in the Pacific, especially literary challenges to colonial representations of identity in the Pacific.
  • Articulate the social, cultural, political and historical contexts of different genres within Pacific poetry and the central arguments surrounding its critical appreciation.
  • Close read a poem by identifying key literary and aesthetic techniques according to both indigenous and western literary traditions.
  • Discuss the politics of publication and anthologizing in the Pacific.
  • Gain a nuanced understanding of the current states of de/colonisation in the Pacific from the perspective of its literature.
  • Consider the politics of insider/outsider critical positioning.

 

 

Course summary:

Date Details